Home Procedures Doctors Reviews Faqs Blog About us Contact Travel Vouchers
Home Procedures Doctors Reviews Faqs Blog About us Contact Travel Vouchers

Frequently asked questions

LenSx Questions

LenSx is considered to be the safest and most effective treatment for lens replacement. Read further to see how LenSx differs from RLE.

Am I good candidate for LenSx?

arrow-procedures

Anyone who has lower quality vision wears glasses or contact lenses regularly or suffers from cataracts are good candidates for LenSx. However, issues such as glaucoma, corneal opacity, poor pupil dilation and previous corneal surgery may mean other surgical options are advisable.

Is the recovery time less than with traditional RLE?

arrow-procedures

Yes, recovery time is considerably less as there is less trauma to the eye without a cut incision to the cornea. The risk of infection is also lower than with non-laser surgery, simply because without an incision there is less contact with surgical tools and it results in a faster healing time.

What are the risks and side effects to LenSx?

arrow-procedures

It is rare for patients to develop side effects after laser-assisted surgery aside from blurry vision, sensitivity to light, itching, or other mild discomforts – which all are connected to the standard RLE procedure. There are no further side effects connected with LenSx and overall the risks are lower in comparison with standard procedure.

In some cases, however, patients may develop a condition called capsular pacification. It should be noted this condition may occur after any RLE surgery. However, the risk of developing a secondary cataract is lower if LenSx is used during the surgery.

In the event this should happen it can be corrected as part of our postoperative care treatment at no additional charge.

What is the difference between RLE and LenSx?

arrow-procedures

The Refractive Lens Exchange surgery can be performed by scalpel (standard RLE) or LenSx femtosecond laser. The advanced technology of LenSx is used to gently shatter the intraocular lens and create an opening in the cornea. It provides precision, control and minimal trauma to the eye.

Could not find what you are looking for? Send us your question and we answer as fast as possible